The Seasonal Rush

Coming into the Christmas season I keep busy stocking up my goods for the local markets. November and December markets are particularly  good and in the past I have often sold out of many lines, especially my antique assemblage designs. This year I am planning ahead a bit and have set off on a period of constant making. Each night I work on something and it’s gratifying to see a nice stock of goodies at the end of the week.

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The hairy arm above is mine, and the bracelets are two that I made today using vintage brass stampings riveted onto my hammered copper cuffs. They’ll go up online in the next few days.

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Don’t you love those little masks? They are handmade in porcelain by a lady who lives in England. I love her rustic, quirky components and use them a lot in my tribal designs. The hydrangea petal drops above are also by her. Those read and white earrings are a favourite of mine.

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Further to the bracelet department I have recently created four new resin ephemera bracelets and a new tribal wrap bangle. Both types of bracelets sell out very quickly and I do love making them so it’s great when I can sit down and re-stock. The tribal bracelet has a great mix of beads including 2,000 year old Roman-era glass beads and 10,000+ year old mammoth bone beads. I work with a lot of old components, but those mammoth bone beads are the oldest thing I have ever touched. They have a lovely earthiness to them, which naturally they would after so long buried in the tundra of the Arctic regions.

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I really really love making tribal style earrings but I am always stumped when it comes to necklaces for the range. This week I was able to overcome the ‘maker’s block’ and use these fantastic polymer clay pendants made by another lady from England, and create three rustic necklaces. The more rustic, dirty and old they look, the better!

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I never forget my roots, and have been busy making a whole lot of assemblage necklaces, earrings and bracelets. I posted some of the earrings and bracelets a few weeks ago, and here are some new necklaces. Above is a very special Eiffel Tower Powder compact necklace. The pendant is paired Labradorite and saltwater keishi pearls, as well as some pretty silver pocket watch chain. It’s a bold design, not for the fainthearted.

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The cross above was for sale in my supplies shop for a while, but nobody bought it. It wasn’t cheap and I suppose you’d have to have a special need or desire to invest so much in a cross. I thought it would look great in a Georgian-inspired design, so I used my remaining black freshwater pearls with some rough gold plated beads to make what you see above. It’s a little bit Gothic, but also a dedication to history, as the cross is 200 years old! The other design shown uses a favourite combination of elements – garnets and pearls.

Finally, I indulged and made a necklace for myself with a lovely old ermine mirror locket I’d been holding onto for what seemed like forever. I used Kasumi-like pearls and the locket – simple construction but it looks great on.  You can’t really see the pearls in the below photo, but you can see the little ermine dangle I attached to the clasp. The other necklace is a re-work of a very rare and special French ex-voto  have had for years. Previously it was on another necklace, but the design was a bit cumbersome and I found I was not wearing it. So I sat down and dedicated a few hours to wire wrapping lots and lots of tiny, buttery Ethiopian Welo opals into a double strand necklace for this lovely locket.

These ex voto heart lockets are so very much in demand at the moment and they command crazy prices – many sell for over 300 euros each. I can’t believe people are paying that much for them, as this little one (and the smaller ones are often the most expensive) cost around 50 euros in Paris about three years ago. I do have another, larger heart so I think I will list that one for sale in my supplies shop. Un-believable!!

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